Saturday, April 14, 2012

M:

There are, I’ve been informed, six basic emotions. Of these, one of the most commonly felt, even more than happiness is that of it's very opposite: sadness. If not most common, it definitely is one of the most easily expressed emotion. Of course, sorrow is not what we ideally desire. What person would want to live a life filled with unhappy moments, of feeling morbidly glum?

But so many of us, in fact I imagine a majority of the world's population, has at some point in life, experienced this in some form or other. I have tried to explain the feeling to myself several times in vain. Perhaps it emerges from an unfulfilled desire, or un-achieved dream. For several, I would venture to say that it is born from a basic necessity of life being unachieved. But for each person who sleeps hungry in the world, there are several who lie in morose pessimism, pondering their lot in life.

Why don’t I have a job as good as my boss does?
Why don’t I have a satisfied life as my employee does?
Why don’t I have more money?
Where should I stash all the money?
Why me?

But whatever the reason, mine not to judge. For the person experiencing it, the feeling is as real as a bleeding gash in the torso.
Blues. They appear like mushrooms and stay on like mold. They burgeon and fester. A balloon that takes up all the space it can.

So for a feeling that is all pervasive; for an emotion that makes no discrimination of sex, class, religion and such; for an omnipotent sense that can debilitate more than most other feelings, an emotion that is as familiar as an old friend, here is the dedication.

M is for Melancholy.

23 comments:

  1. Loved this post. It's feeling stronger than happiness according to me!

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    1. Thanks Anjali, I hope happiness takes over!

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  2. Found you on the a-z blog challenge.
    Great blog concept....today I'm feeling Mellow.

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    1. Thanks a bunch for visiting! Methinks mellow is better than melancholy.

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  3. Hmmm...I wonder when when I'm tired I tend to feel melancholic too.

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    1. Thanks, J.L.! I do feel that way and the other way around, as well. When I'm not happy, I feel tired.

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    2. I wonder what it is about being sad that's so debilitating.

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  4. Of course everyone gets sad; however, I do my utmost to stay on the cheery side. At times it does take some effort. Ultimately, the choice between being a sad sack and a happy-go-lucky person starts with a choice.

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    1. Jeremy, I agree. Are most feelings that way I wonder.

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  5. "A balloon that takes up all the space it can." Brilliant.

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  6. Brilliant and thought provoking, as always, right from SCDB. :)

    You wrote, "one of the most commonly felt, even more than happiness, is... sadness." Somehow, I feel that humans are happy more than 50% of the time, and sad lesser. I know that in some countries (Australia, Denmark), happiness may be more common, while in others (North Korea, Sudan) less so. But the average happiness quotient must be high. Otherwise, humans would not be thriving and evolving so well.

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    1. Thanks, Rajendra. I'd like to think that more people are happy than not. It's just that complaining comes easier to several people. I'm not looking at statistics, I'm looking at personal experiences. Maybe I don't have the right mix, eh! :) :)

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  7. Thank you for visiting and leaving your comments! I absolutely LOVE the different opinions. Thank you, thank you, all!
    I really need to figure out how to change up my comments so that I can leave a reply for each comment!

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    1. Finally! I figured out how to do this! And am supposed to be a physicist, good lord!

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  8. SK - brilliant post. I remember reading that most of a common persons thought are "covered by the snow of pessimism and the ice of cynicism". To add to Mr.Rajendra Yadav's post - If I remember right, the highest Happiness Index is in Bhutan. Not sure. Pls feel free to correct it. Once again an amazing post. Keep going. :-)

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    1. Thanks, KK. Your line about the common person's thought being covered by the snow of pessimism is brilliant! It hits the point exactly.
      I don't know about statistics: I hate saying this, but I tend not to believe statistics most of the time. But you may be right.

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  9. Here we go http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gross_national_happiness

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  10. You've described Melancholy so well! I've known people who "want to live a life filled with unhappy moments, of feeling morbidly glum". It's like a contagious disease that reaches out to the sunniest of us - makes us want to sigh when we want to smile.

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    1. Thank you, Geeta. You are so right, such people pull everyone down.

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